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Kally O’Reilly earned her PhD in Cellular and Molecular Biology at the University of Texas at Austin in Texas in 2008. Her thesis work focused on pharmacological induced changes in depression-related behaviors and neural network interactions in the adolescent mouse brain. She then started her postdoctoral work with Menno Witter at the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience/Centre for the Biology of Memory at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim Norway. Her postdoctoral research examines the development of hippocampal/parahippocampal regions. She has focused on early postnatal development of connections using traditional retrograde and anterograde tracing techniques. The need to delineate hippocampal/parahippocampal regions for her studies has led to the synthesis of the neonatal atlas with chemoarchitectonic markers.


Contact Details

Kally C. O’Reilly, PhD
Postdoctor – Witter Group
Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience, Centre for the Biology of Memory
MTFS, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)
NO-7489 Trondheim, Norway
Email: kally.oreilly at(@)ntnu.no

 

NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=O'Reilly KC[Author] NCBI pubmed
  • Related Articles MicroRNAs contribute to postnatal development of laminar differences and neuronal subtypes in the rat medial entorhinal cortex. Brain Struct Funct. 2017 Mar 04;: Authors: Olsen LC, O'Reilly KC, Liabakk NB, Witter MP, Sætrom P Abstract The medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) is important in spatial navigation and memory formation and its layers have distinct neuronal subtypes, connectivity, spatial properties, and disease susceptibility. As little is known about the molecular basis for the development of these laminar differences, we analyzed microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression differences between rat MEC layer II and layers III-VI during postnatal development. We identified layer and age-specific regulation of gene expression by miRNAs, which included processes related to neuron specialization and locomotor behavior. Further analyses by retrograde labeling and expression profiling of layer II stellate neurons and in situ hybridization revealed that the miRNA most up-regulated in layer II, miR-143, was enriched in stellate neurons, whereas the miRNA most up-regulated in deep layers, miR-219-5p, was expressed in ependymal cells, oligodendrocytes and glia. Bioinformatics analyses of predicted mRNA targets with negatively correlated expression patterns to miR-143 found that miR-143 likely regulates the Lmo4 gene, which is known to influence hippocampal-based spatial learning. PMID: 28260163 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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